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Name That Trauma:: Werewoof of London on a Twilight Zone Magazine Story

January 14th, 2021 by unkle lancifer · 5 Comments

Back in the mid-80’s my parents would bring us kids along when they would hang out at their friend’s house.  This friend had an EXTENSIVE horror and science fiction library, and I spent every hour over there reading all the Stephen King, Clive Barker, Twilight Zone and Alfred Hitchcock Magazines that I could get my hands on. It was in one of those Twilight Zone Magazines that I recall reading a story that I have wanted to re-read for years, as it freaked me out so much as a kid.

But, of course, I cannot find anything on this short story anywhere online…
The few details I do remember is that it was about a man who was staying in a stone cottage by the sea (maybe at the top of a cliff?) and for whatever reason, he ignores warnings to not do something or other, and winds up awakening some large stones that are sticking out from the sea, and during the night, he can hear them making their way up the path to his house, and they end up (I think) melting into the house, and engulfing him as well. I think the stones may have been referred to as The 3 Sisters? 

I know it’s not a movie or TV horror, but I’m hoping someone can help!
-Werewoof_of_London

Tags: Name That Trauma!




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bdwilcox
bdwilcox
1 month ago

You can view pretty much the entire Twilight Zone Magazine archive here:
https://archive.org/details/pulpmagazinearchive?and%5B%5D=twilight+zone&sort=publicdate

RATSAWGOD
RATSAWGOD
1 month ago

Welcome back, boys!

Werewoof_of_London
Werewoof_of_London
1 month ago

Welcome back and thanks for posting my Name That Trauma!

bdwilcox- Wow- what a great resource, thanks! I took a look through the Fiction titles on all the contents pages there and didn’t see anything that jumped out to me, so now I’ll be going back through and reading through them….may take a while, lol.

chainman
chainman
1 month ago

I think you are absolutely 100% correct about the stones being called the “Three Sisters” that’s a nautical term for rogue waves. Three Sisters rogue waves might have sunk the Edmund Fitzgerald. I’ve Googled a bit using Three Sisters and Lake Superior but I’ve come up empty. If you can think of any more details it would be helpful to the search.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vST6hVRj2A&ab_channel=Zeezy

Rogue wave hypothesis
A group of three rogue waves, often called “three sisters,”[104] was reported in the vicinity of Edmund Fitzgerald at the time she sank.[32][105] The “three sisters” phenomenon is said to occur on Lake Superior as a result of a sequence of three rogue waves forming that are one-third larger than normal waves. The first wave introduces an abnormally large amount of water onto the deck. This water is unable to fully drain away before the second wave strikes, adding to the surplus. The third incoming wave again adds to the two accumulated backwashes, quickly overloading the deck with too much water.[32]

Captain Cooper of Arthur M. Anderson reported that his ship was “hit by two 30 to 35 foot seas about 6:30 p.m., one burying the aft cabins and damaging a lifeboat by pushing it right down onto the saddle. The second wave of this size, perhaps 35 foot, came over the bridge deck.”[104] Cooper went on to say that these two waves, possibly followed by a third, continued in the direction of Edmund Fitzgerald and would have struck about the time she sank.[105] This hypothesis postulates that the “three sisters” compounded the twin problems of Edmund Fitzgerald’s known list and her lower speed in heavy seas that already allowed water to remain on her deck for longer than usual.[104]

The “Edmund Fitzgerald” episode of the 2010 television series Dive Detectives features the wave-generating tank of the National Research Council’s Institute for Naval Technology in St. John’s, and the tank’s simulation of the effect of a 17-meter (56 ft) rogue wave upon a scale model of Edmund Fitzgerald. The simulation indicated such a rogue wave could almost completely submerge the bow or stern of the ship with water, at least temporarily.[106]